Thursday, June 18, 2015

You Are What You Eat - Medical Info

You are what you eat. But do you recall munching some molybdenum or snacking on selenium? Some 60 chemical elements are found in the body, but what all of them are doing there is still unknown.

INFORMATION
 
Roughly 96 percent of the mass of the human body is made up of just four elements: oxygen, carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen, with a lot of that in the form of water. The remaining 4 percent is a sparse sampling of the periodic table of elements.

Some of the more prominent representatives are called macro nutrients, whereas those appearing only at the level of parts per million or less are referred to as micronutrients.

These nutrients perform various functions, including the building of bones and cell structures, regulating the body's pH, carrying charge, and driving chemical reactions.

The FDA has set a reference daily intake for 12 minerals (calcium, iron, phosphorous, iodine, magnesium, zinc, selenium, copper, manganese, chromium, molybdenum and chloride). Sodium and potassium also have recommended levels, but they are treated separately.

However, this does not exhaust the list of elements that you need. Sulfur is not usually mentioned as a dietary supplement because the body gets plenty of it in proteins.

And there are several other elements — such as silicon, boron, nickel, vanadium and lead — that may play a biological role but are not classified as essential.

"This may be due to the fact that a biochemical function has not been defined by experimental evidence," said Victoria Drake from the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University.

Sometimes all that is known is that lab animals performed poorly when their diets lacked a particular non-essential element. However, identifying the exact benefit an element confers can be difficult as they rarely enter the body in a pure form.

"We don't look at them as single elements but as elements wrapped up in a compound," said Christine Gerbstadt, national spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association.

A normal diet consists of thousands of compounds (some containing trace elements) whose effects are the study of ongoing research. For now, we can only say for certain what 20 or so elements are doing. Here is a quick rundown, with the percentage of body weight in parentheses.

Oxygen (65%) and hydrogen (10%) are predominantly found in water, which makes up about 60 percent of the body by weight. It's practically impossible to imagine life without water.

Carbon (18%) is synonymous with life. Its central role is due to the fact that it has four bonding sites that allow for the building of long, complex chains of molecules. Moreover, carbon bonds can be formed and broken with a modest amount of energy, allowing for the dynamic organic chemistry that goes on in our cells.

Nitrogen (3%) is found in many organic molecules, including the amino acids that make up proteins, and the nucleic acids that make up DNA.

Calcium (1.5%) is the most common mineral in the human body — nearly all of it found in bones and teeth. Ironically, calcium's most important role is in bodily functions, such as muscle contraction and protein regulation. In fact, the body will actually pull calcium from bones (causing problems like osteoporosis) if there's not enough of the element in a person's diet.

Phosphorus (1%) is found predominantly in bone but also in the molecule ATP, which provides energy in cells for driving chemical reactions.

Potassium (0.25%) is an important electrolyte (meaning it carries a charge in solution). It helps regulate the heartbeat and is vital for electrical signaling in nerves.

Sulfur (0.25%) is found in two amino acids that are important for giving proteins their shape.

Sodium (0.15%) is another electrolyte that is vital for electrical signaling in nerves. It also regulates the amount of water in the body.

Chlorine (0.15%) is usually found in the body as a negative ion, called chloride. This electrolyte is important for maintaining a normal balance of fluids.

Magnesium (0.05%) plays an important role in the structure of the skeleton and muscles. It also is necessary in more than 300 essential metabolic reactions.

Iron (0.006%) is a key element in the metabolism of almost all living organisms. It is also found in hemoglobin, which is the oxygen carrier in red blood cells. Half of women don't get enough iron in their diet.

Fluorine (0.0037%) is found in teeth and bones. Outside of preventing tooth decay, it does not appear to have any importance to bodily health.

Zinc (0.0032%) is an essential trace element for all forms of life. Several proteins contain structures called "zinc fingers" help to regulate genes. Zinc deficiency has been known to lead to dwarfism in developing countries.

Copper (0.0001%) is important as an electron donor in various biological reactions. Without enough copper, iron won't work properly in the body.

Iodine (0.000016%) is required for making of thyroid hormones, which regulate metabolic rate and other cellular functions. Iodine deficiency, which can lead to goiter and brain damage, is an important health problem throughout much of the world.

Selenium
(0.000019%) is essential for certain enzymes, including several anti-oxidants. Unlike animals, plants do not appear to require selenium for survival, but they do absorb it, so there are several cases of selenium poisoning from eating plants grown in selenium-rich soils.

Chromium (0.0000024%) helps regulate sugar levels by interacting with insulin, but the exact mechanism is still not completely understood.

Manganese (0.000017%) is essential for certain enzymes, in particular those that protect mitochondria — the place where usable energy is generated inside cells — from dangerous oxidants.

Molybdenum (0.000013%) is essential to virtually all life forms. In humans, it is important for transforming sulfur into a usable form. In nitrogen-fixing bacteria, it is important for transforming nitrogen into a usable form.

Cobalt (0.0000021%) is contained in vitamin B12, which is important in protein formation and DNA regulation. 

Product
Hazardous Ingredient
Possible Effects
In the garage
Antifreeze
Ethylene glycol
Poisonous if swallowed -- can cause severe damage to heart, kidneys, brain. Inhalation can cause dizziness.
Keep your pets away from spilled antifreeze. Its sweet smell is attractive to animals, but licking or drinking the fluid can kill your pet. Before purchasing antifreeze, look at the label for products containing propylene glycol. This is a much safer alternative.
Motor oil
Heavy metals
Can cause nerve and kidney damage; is thought to cause cancer

Hydrocarbons
Some forms thought to cause cancer.
Batteries (car, boat, tractor)
Sulfuric acid
Can cause severe skin burns, and blindness

Lead
Can cause nerve and kidney damage; is thought to cause cancer
Windshield washer fluid
Methanol
Can damage the nervous system, liver, kidneys; inhalation can lead to lung disease; ingestion can cause blindness

Ethylene glycol
Poisonous if swallowed -- can cause severe damage to heart, kidneys, brain. Inhalation can cause dizziness.

Isopropanol
Can irritates mucous membranes; ingestion results in drowsiness, unconsciousness and death
Paint
Organic solvents
Can irritate eyes and skin; cause cracking of skin. Inhaling paint fumes can result in headaches, nausea, dizziness, and fatigue

In the laundry room/utility room
Laundry detergent
Cationic, anionic, or non- ionic solutions
If swallowed, cationic detergents can cause nausea, vomiting, shock, convulsions, and coma. Non-ionic detergents can irritate skin and eyes
All-purpose cleaners
Ammonia
Fumes can irritate eyes and lungs; can cause burns or rashes on skin; can produce deadly chloramine gas if mixed with chlorine containing products
NEVER mix ammonia with chlorine (bleach). This mixture produces a gas that can cause serious breathing problems and be potentially fatal

Ethylene glycol monobutyl acetate
Poisonous if swallowed -- can cause severe damage to heart, kidneys, brain. Inhalation can cause dizziness.

Sodium hypochlorite
Corrosive to skin and lining of nose mouth and throat; fumes irritating to eyes and respiratory tract
Bleach
Sodium hypochlorite solution
Corrosive to skin and lining of nose mouth and throat; fumes irritating to eyes and respiratory tract
NEVER mix bleach with other cleaners – especially ammonia – and also toilet bowl cleaners and drain cleaners. A gas can be produced that can cause serious breathing problems and even death
Pet flea and tick treatments
Organophosphates and carbamates
Can cause headache, dizziness, twitching, nausea; shown to cause cancer in animals
Insecticides
Organophosphates and carbamates
Can cause headache, dizziness, twitching, nausea; shown to cause cancer in animals
In the kitchen
Dishwashing detergents
Cationic, anionic, or non- ionic solutions plus phosphates (automatic dishwasher detergents)
Automatic products can cause skin irritation or burns; hand dishwashing products are milder, though can cause irritation to mouth, throat, and GI tract
Oven cleaners
Lye (consisting of either sodium hydroxide or potassium hydroxide)
Extremely corrosive, burns skin and eyes; can be fatal if swallowed; aerosols disperse chemicals, increasing inhalation dangers
Non-toxic oven cleaners without lye are available. Look at the label and select a product that does not contain lye.
Antibacterial cleaner
Ammonia, Detergents, Lye
see descriptions above

Cresol
Can be corrosive to tissue; damages liver, kidneys, lungs, pancreas and spleen

Phenol
Can cause central nervous system depression; severely affect circulatory system; corrosive to skin; suspected of causing cancer

Pine oil
Can irritate eyes and lining of nose mouth and throat
Window and glass cleaner
Ammonia
Fumes can irritate eyes and lungs; can cause burns or rashes on skin; can produce deadly chloramine gas if mixed with chlorine containing products

isopropanol
Can irritates mucous membranes; ingestion results in drowsiness, unconsciousness and death
Insect bait traps
Organophosphates and carbamates
Can cause headache, dizziness, twitching, nausea; shown to cause cancer in animals

In the bathroom
Toilet bowel cleaners
Sodium bisulfate
Forms sulfuric acid, which is corrosive, burns skin

Oxalic acid
Can damage kidney and liver; irritate eyes and respiratory tract; corrodes mouth and stomach

5-dimethyldantoin
Forms hypochlorite in water, which is corrosive to skin and mucous membranes

Hydrochloric acid
Fumes are extremely corrosive; burns skin

Phenol
Can cause central nervous system depression; severely affect circulatory system; corrosive to skin; suspected of causing cancer
Mold and mildew removers
Chlorine and alkyl ammonium chlorides
Can cause breathing problems; if swallowed, can burn throat
Drain cleaners
Lye and sulfuric acid
Can cause burns to skin and in severe cases, blindness if splashed in eye

In the living room
Rug, carpet, upholstery cleaners
Perchloroethylene
Fumes cause dizziness, sleepiness, nausea, loss of appetite and disorientation; can cause cancer with long-term exposure

Naphthalene
Can damage liver; prolonged vapor exposure has led to cataract formation
Furniture polish
Ammonia, naphtha, nitrobenzene, petroleum distillates, and phenol
Can irritate your skin, eyes, throat, lungs and windpipe; if swallowed, furniture polish can cause nausea and vomiting
Air fresheners
Formaldehyde
A strong irritant to the eyes, throat, skin and lungs; thought to cause cancer

Petroleum distillates
Can irritate skin, eyes, respiratory tract; may cause fatal pulmonary edema; flammable

P-Dichlorobenzene
Fumes can be irritating to skin, eyes and throat

Aerosol propellants
Fumes associated with brain damage or highly flammable
Household foggers
Pyrethrins
Can cause severe allergic dermatitis, systemic allergic reactions. Large amounts may cause nausea, vomiting, tinnitus, headache, & other CNS disturbances

Permethrin
Can cause itching and burning of the skin and eyes; irritate the upper respiratory tract

Methoprene
Can irritate the skin and eyes

In the bedroom
Mothballs
Naphthalene, P-Dichlorobenzene
Can cause headaches, dizziness, and irritate the skin, eyes, and throat; cataract formation and liver damage can results from prolonged exposure

In the backyard, pool and garden shed
Swimming pool chloride tablets
Sodium (or calcium) hypochlorite
Corrosive to skin and lining of nose mouth and throat; fumes irritating to eyes and respiratory tract
Insect repellents
Butopyronoxyl
Can cause mild necrosis in liver and kidney –in animals

Cimethyl phthalate
Can cause central nervous system depression if swallowed

Diethyltoluamide (DEET)
Can irritate sensitive skin and respiratory tract tissues as well as loss of coordination, anxiety, behavioral changes, and mental confusion
Weed killers
diquat, 2,4-D, and glyphosate
Can irritate the eyes and skin; can cause abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea
Rodent control
warfarin
Causes internal bleeding if ingested in large amounts








Be aware upon the given information above that the details are helpful considering such chemicals are harmful to a person considering it is in contradiction of the body's proper function. It is to be aware so as to the chemical compositions and the proper information so as to the different roles of each chemical that may put a person either in good position or bad position. Be hopeful that such information gives an insight so as health and science in concerned.

1 comments:

  1. This is very educational information. I really like reading this information, it is very helpful for me. Thank you so much for sharing this blog. shark cartilage

    ReplyDelete

 

This is A Pitz Blogsite.

Newsletter

Subscribe now on these links:

Contact:

Email: pitz_441@yahoo.com